Tag: magazine

The Craft Snack Drawer

The Craft Snack Drawer

When I migrated from my old website to this one, I did so because I wanted a safe space to write about the things that were important to me. A lot of my writing is about the things I make, either as handmade projects, art […]

Eskimimi In German Print

Eskimimi In German Print

A short while ago I was contacted by the editor of the German language version of The Knitter magazine asking for advice on one of the projects that appeared in my photography tutorial article in The Knitter as part of the magazine’s Masterclass series, as the article […]

Cottage Crafting And Panic Craft Magazine Sampling

Cottage Crafting And Panic Craft Magazine Sampling

The past few days have seen the annual long weekend where we traditionally go away with a huge group of friends to eat, drink, be merry and play boardgames (whilst maintaining the eating and drinking theme). Because it is a number of days away from home and I am not so hardy as some of my companions at withstanding the late nights and hard partying that the cottage weekend has grown to become, I like to bring with me some quiet, enjoyable craft that I can curl up under a blanket with to give myself a little bit of downtime whilst staying amongst the noise and energy of my companions. As the body of Russell’s jumper is a relatively simple knit I decided to take that with me to concentrate working on, but we had only been at the cottage a couple of hours when I suddenly realised with some horror that I had not seen or unloaded the bag with my knitting from the car and that it was still sat at home, far away from me.

In a bit of a panic I decided that I needed something to help me to settle down in quiet moments and so we hit the news stands at the local supermarket, looking through the selection of magazines that came with little free kits that I might be able to work on, and I picked up two titles: Craftseller and CrossStitcher.
craftseller and cross stitcher magazinesI have bought CrossStitcher a number of times before, mostly for the little kits that used to provide me with a few hours of distraction when I never had any yarn or knitting tools. The kits are usually quite standard and simple and easy to complete. The one that was included in this issue of the magazine was for a stylised dove motif stitches using dissolvable canvas on a piece of linen cloth to be mounted in an embroidery hoop. One thing that was immediately a bit problematic was the the  nut and bolt that are supposed to hold the embroidery hoop together were missing, so I’ll have to rig up some other way of holding the completed project together.
Festive hoop kit cross stitch kitI had a couple more issues with the materials included with the kit, but the one that has caused me the most issue is that the dissolvable canvas was very stiff and inflexible but also very creased and crinkled, so where the instructions for use say to pin the canvas to the fabric (I had to tack it to the fabric as I never had any pins available) it is pretty much impossible to stitch neatly through the dissolvable canvas to the fabric as it is so uneven.

The second magazine that I bought was called Craftseller. This is the first time that I had seen this particular title, and the premise struck me as slightly strange. As the name suggests it is a magazine specifically aimed at people who wish to make a profit from their crafting endeavours. Many of the mostly small and simple projects have a summary of the cost per item made lines up against the likely selling cost of the finished project. In the most part these suggested selling prices are very low considering the time taken to complete the projects, but still quite high for the finished object. I personally think that the projects included work far better for little personal projects to enjoy creating and keeping yourself or giving to friends as special gifts.
Felt reindeer kit on craftseller magazineAs I have returned from the cottage trip with a truly exhausting bout of the ‘flu (and I promise it is the ‘flu and not a hangover!) I feel encumbered by the bulk and restrictions of a large knitting project and I ache and hurt to sit at the sewing machine, so I am going to complete both of these little kits in my quiet moments as well as perhaps set up to knit a much smaller project that I can hopefully complete in a day or two. Hopefully when I am better I will also be able to give a little attention to my sewing Work In Progress which currently looks like nothing on earth.
Sewing work in progress
I hope that if this is your first visit to the new site that you like the changes. I think it looks a lot cleaner and simpler, though there are still a few tweaks that I will likely make as I go along. There is a new blog feed available, and some users may have to re-subscribe if you usually follow via Bloglovin’, Feedly, Newsify or any other feed aggregator/reader (though obviously if you are reading this in an RSS feed then it would seem to be working fine – hurrah!) I have also updated all of the social media links available in the sidebar. Please do let me know if you notice anything that isn’t working properly, or any dead links. This should be a lot easier now that I have been able to move away from Blogger’s commenting service to the much more streamlined WordPress commenting form which will hopefully now not exclude anyone from commenting!

Thanks again for visiting and being a reader of Eskimimi Makes.

FO And New Pattern: Turquoise Socks

FO And New Pattern: Turquoise Socks

A new pattern of mine is out in the most recent issue of Simply Knitting due to hit the stands in a couple of days. The socks feature an easy to memorise lace motif that places the shaping of the lace pattern between columns of […]

Eskimimi Makes In Knitscene

Eskimimi Makes In Knitscene

When I arrived home from work yesterday my mail box was practically bursting with the bulk of a magazine delivery from distant shores as the Winter edition of Knitscene had made its long trip across the Atlantic and into my hands. These were exciting times […]

Back To Knitting

Back To Knitting

Do you ever go through a period where you just don’t fancy picking up your favourite pastime, hobby or craft, even though it is usually one of the things that gives you the most joy, or is one of the most fulfilling ways to spend your spare time?

I know that I have been through this a number of times, most notably when I suffered some difficulties in my past that found me very depressed and homeless, which took me a long while to get over. In fact, I don’t know if I would have knit again if it weren’t for the love and kindness of people who encouraged me, sent me needles and yarn when I lost all of my possessions and reminded me that I was still important.

But I still I find that setbacks can make me shy away from creating. I have often pondered on why, and though I have long suspected that it is partly because I have some inner fear that if I knit, paint or otherwise indulge in my favourite things when I am depressed that those same hobbies in better times will carry some of the memory of those feelings over with them, I am increasingly of the thought that a lot of the things I most enjoy are quite meditative – they leave me alone with my faults whilst my hands are put to use, especially when considered with the rhythmic movements of the knitting needles. If I am bothered by something or upset in this meditative time I find that I am likely to sit and cogitate the thing that is upsetting me, and this relaxing time instead becomes a period of me worrying about a problem, with each turn in my head seeking out more and more detail until I can think of nothing else.
Recently I have had a relatively minor upset, but it was knitting related, and therefore seemed to somehow affect me differently. After the pattern attribution error I felt my work was completely unvalued. Not because of the error itself – as bad as it was there is a difference between human error, even through negligence to check important details, and a purposeful disregard of people and how you treat them. It was the reaction afterwards when I tried to contact the magazine to sort it out as soon as possible that caused so much hurt. I know that the world of publishing is busy and frenetic, but more than a whole week later I am still awaiting any kind of answer as to whether my knitted samples are going to be safely returned to me.
Anyway, because it was related to the value of my work, the feeling of my knitting being pointless and without value crept over into my personal knitting, and as I sat down with part of a jumper sleeve I couldn’t enjoy the progress of my knitting.
For several nights I sat without a project in my lap, which I would usually enjoy working on in the evenings as I relaxed. I think this is partly because I feel so comfortable with knitting – I don’t have to concentrate on it very much so it does not take my head and fill it with the task at hand – there is too much room left for TV, talking, or, in bad times, ruminating on negative feelings.
So, with the hours of the weekend to fill I devised a way to get back on track and create again. Because I do not sew very often I would have to pay far more attention to and invest far more concentration to a sewing project, which is how I came to sit down with my sewing machine, lengths of fabric and zippers to make project bags.
And it really has helped. The sewing acted a bit like pressing ‘reset’ on a backlog of creativity, and yesterday I picked up my needles and finished off that first sleeve.
And it may not seem like a massive step forward, but I enjoyed knitting that sleeve and feeling the worth of it adding towards the sweater that I have in progress.
And so it happens, just after I had resolved to give up on hoping for any resolution to the problem brought about by the magazine, the post on the website that I had been told a week ago would be posted has been published on the magazine’s blog, and you can read it in full here. It’s not really an apology, or even a correction as there is no mention made that it was mis-attributed to begin with, but rather a plain statement of ‘this is this’. I’m not going to dwell on whether this is the right way or wrong way, it’s the way it is, and so we go on. I am happy with my knitting. I am happy with my sock design. I am happy with the stripes of two ends of a Zauberball and cosy yarn, and I shall consider this over and to forget about, even though I still await some reply about the sample knits. I shall not think of it when I pick my needles up for the second sleeve tonight, and I shall try to let only positive thoughts dance through my head as my needles dance around each other leaving a path of yarn behind them, creating something of value, if only to me.