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Tissue Paper Watercolour Rainbow – A Toddler Art Project

Tissue Paper Watercolour Rainbow – A Toddler Art Project

Here’s a fantastic project that you can do with your toddler or guide an older child to complete themselves that involves minimal cost and effort to prepare. The idea for this project came about whilst we were making the Tissue Paper Sun-Catcher Butterfly, and the […]

Spinning A 3-Ply Progressive Rainbow

Spinning A 3-Ply Progressive Rainbow

I haven’t spun in a long while. I’ve spun on and off for the better part of ten years, first on spindles and then I later bought myself a spinning wheel as a congratulations to myself for persisting. It was one of my more symbolic […]

Sing A Rainbow

Sing A Rainbow

Here are a few pictures of a recent(ish) jumper that I knit for Baby Awesome. It has everything I could want in a baby jumper: Squishiness, rainbows, and a smiley miniature person wearing it.

These photos were actually taken all the way back into September. I’d actually been sitting on them a little while as I did think about writing up and releasing this as a pattern, but I don’t know if the practicalities would be worth it. The sweater came about as I had bought the yarn to make a rainbow yoked cardigan that I had seen one grey day. Foolishly I did not read into the details far enough as though it was a raglan shaped cardigan, each of the two front pieces, back and two sleeves were knit separately. Each of the pieces carried each of the six rainbow colours and the base colour, so:

7 colours x 2 ends x 5 pieces = 70 ends, plus the need to seam up all those raglan shapings, lining up the different colours, in garter stitch. Ha ha ha ha no. It’s not that it would be difficult, but then reading the phone directory isn’t difficult. Deciding that I didn’t need something so soul-destroying in my life I instead decided to design a sweater, with a good sized and styled neck for adorable giant toddler heads, still using raglan shapings but (crucially) knit in a single piece. Seven colours, two ends each. Easy peasy. Actually, I then added a rainbow garter cuff to each sleeve to give myself an additional; 24 ends because I secretly hate myself, oh, and the garter border at the hem, but these were both completely optional, and at least added to the goodness to brilliance awesome rainbowy-ness of it. Frankly, we need more rainbows, and I sewed those ends in for the good of us all. If I had stuck solely to the rainbow yoke (as the pattern I had first intended to knit) then I would have taken the sweater from 70 to 14 ends, saving 80% of end weaving and eliminating all the seaming, and that was good enough for me.

Since finishing the sweater I have started on an accompanying blanket with the remaining yarn, and my erstwhile friend Mr Crochet Hook has come to visit. I don’t crochet very often (because my wrist clicks so much that it sounds like someone has lost a very confused tap dancer in the vicinity), but for a quick and satisfying way to whizz through your embarrassingly large quantity of leftover yarn, it’s perfect.

Once the blanket is complete I will get a picture of both the sweater and crocheted throw together, and bring more rainbows into the world.

FO: Rainbow Baby Tank Top

FO: Rainbow Baby Tank Top

After finishing Mr Awesome’s Socks a few weeks ago using Regia’s Pairfect yarn, I had written about my intention to use the same line of yarn in a non-sock project. The yarn is specifically designed for use in sock knitting, made to produce two perfectly […]

Wearing Rainbows (Cute Baby In Knitwear Alert)

Wearing Rainbows (Cute Baby In Knitwear Alert)

Knitting whilst I was pregnant felt like a wonderful thing. It made me look forwards to the impending birth (or, rather, welcoming our little boy to our lives) and helped me through the nervousness and weeks of feeling like I wanted to be doing something […]

FO: A T-Shirt Made Of Rainbows

FO: A T-Shirt Made Of Rainbows

On Wednesday I was having a rather difficult time of things. I’d had a really positive hospital appointment the previous day and been out for a bite to eat with Mr Awesome and the other prospective parents in our small ante-natal class the evening before, but I woke up on Wednesday in a lot of discomfort and feeling rather poorly. ConsequentlyI felt I needed something other than plain blue rounds of chubby little baby leg to distract me from each round of baby gymnastics that had started to, along with a few test contractions for fun, exacerbate a few of my past scars. And what is more pleasurably distracting than a yarn that refuses to decide what colour it will be?
Zauberball 6-Ply in shade PapageiI have spoken many times of the ills that a good Zauberball can help heal, so in lieu of strong pain relief or the ability to sleep, I chose the most randomly coloured concoction from my little medicine chest of healing Zauberballs and cast on the simplest pattern I could find, which happened to be Julie Chanudet’s little striped sweater, Langoz.
I deviated away from the pattern only in small details and the order/method of construction. I knit the back and arm raglan increases to the underarm first, retained these on the circular needle and then knit the front raglan increases from the other end of the Zauberball, which I had re-wound into a centre-pull skein with the help of a patient husband. Once both pieces were knit to the underarm I did not cast off any stitches, but rather overlapped the front 5 button band stitches over those of the back and continued with the live yarn to knit together off of front and back needles to save casting off and seaming later.
I had considered striping the rest of the body using the two Zauberball ends to give even more play of colour, but then decided to let the Zauberball do what it does best and let it play with the colour for me, and just observe.

I decided to leave the sweater sleeves short, so making this a T-shirt rather than the original sweater of the pattern. Partly this was because I wanted an instantaneous knitting hit: some immediate knitting karma, but also because I don’t know if I would have been able to get over mis-matched colour sequences in the sleeves (and as Zauberballs do not have regularly ordered stripes in either colour or length of colour progressions, my inner wish to have the sleeves matching would be elusive, if not indeed impossible). To help give the sleeves a more definitive finish, they cease where the raglan increases end, and are finished by way of a short 12-row garter stitch cuff made in Drops Baby Alpaca in an off-white shade. This is complemented by a matching bottom hem and off-white buttons along the ‘help me dress this wiggly baby’ neck opening.
The only other detail I added was the inclusion of three vertical stripes, again in the Drops Baby Alpaca, which I embroidered onto the left side of the T-shirt in duplicate stitch, just to help tie all of the elements of the shirt together; to highlight the raglan shaping (due to the difference in line hight reflecting the raglan edge); to bring the yarn used in the trim details into the main piece and to provide a nice contrast to the strong horizontal stripes presented by the shifting hues of the yarn.

The finished T-shirt took less than two very poorly days to complete, and would make a great last-minute baby gift.
Pattern: Langoz by Julie Chanudet
Yarn: Schoppel-Wolle Zauberball Stärke 6 in the shade Papagei.