Tag: scarf

Yellow Wagtail Scarf

Yellow Wagtail Scarf

I knit Sarah Hatton’s Yellow Wagtail Scarf from the A Year Of Techniques project about four months ago, and I haven’t written about it until now due to not having managed to get any decent pictures. Unfortunately I can’t see that changing any time soon so […]

Finished and Blocked: Brambling Shawl in Fyberspates Cumulus

Finished and Blocked: Brambling Shawl in Fyberspates Cumulus

The blocking thread has finally been pulled free of my Brambling Shawl, and the finished piece is ready for a photograph, even if I have to pull a few funny shapes so that I can stand back far enough from it to get the whole […]

Knitting April Into May

Knitting April Into May

I have been taking part in the first three months of the A Year Of Techniques project being run by ACKnitwear: a year of monthly projects which each focus on a new technique. Starting in March, the first month’s technique, helical stripes, offered up a project of fingerless mitts/armwarmers, worked quickly in single row, jogless stripes. April’s technique and project was a shawl worked in simple colourblock intarsia. I have worked intarsia before, in projects such as Kaffe Fassett’s Tumbling Blocks Cushion, but I haven’t re-visited the technique for some years now, so it was a good excuse to reacquaint myself, and a great opportunity to apply the technique to a piece that is both modern in design and very wearable as a light but warm scarf.

The first few days of knitting the Brambling Shawl whizzed by quite quickly, and I worked the knitting at a quick but unhurried pace, and soon found myself at the midpoint; the swelled belly of the shawl with the longest rows, well before half the month had passed, so was scheduled to finish about half way into the month. And then I mentioned to Russell, my husband (Mr Awesome, Mr Codd) that I had for some time wanted a new website, a nice, fresh platform to enjoy, and there and then we bought a new domain and set to work in the evenings, in that little bit of time between the toddler’s bedtime and the bit where we pass out from happy exhaustion.

And then… It was May!

I had to make a choice between whether to carry on knitting the Brambling shawl or to cast on for May’s pattern, with the lovely CoopKnit’s Socks Yeah! yarn for the third monthly pattern instalment. I ended up touting my bag of knitting to the coffee shop one day when Darwin fell asleep on the buggy ride to town, and knocked out a few quick rows of the simple intarsia design, with my trusty iPad by my side to keep track of my rows. When I sat down that evening I only had a 140 decreasing rows to knit, and polished the whole thing off whilst watching a couple of episodes of Westworld.

The mammoth size of the shawl/scarf in comparison to one of my usual project undertakings perhaps belies how much ‘work’ went into the knitting. Once into the rhythm of reading and noting the pattern in a way that I could quickly refer to the actions on each row (whether one or more colours shifted left or right, and whether the shawl needed an increase or decrease worked to widen or narrow it), the knitting was simple and pleasurable. The finished shawl is now blocking, but before it went into the soapy water it felt as light and wispy as air, but as warm as a cuddle due to the soft halo of the yarn.

I’ve taken to using an old favourite blocking method whilst the shawl dries, and have threaded embroidery thread under each outermost purl ridge of the garter stitch edges, along all three edges of the triangular shawl. I’ve hurt my back at some point over the past week, and the thought of pinning out an 8ft shawl into shape made me wince with the prospect. Instead, I sat in comfort on the sofa with a darning needle and length of embroidery floss until all three sides were threaded in preparation, and then secured the threads taught on my blocking surface using just three pins. The edges are kept poker straight and my back is thankful.

I’ll try and get a picture of the finished shawl once it is off the blocking mats, though goodness knows how, it’s so perfectly big and airy I might just have to lay it out on the lawn and hope that a passing aerial photography satellite passes overhead. It’s definitely a project that is easier to wear and love than it is to photograph.

Knitting The Brambling Shawl

Knitting The Brambling Shawl

The second month’s instalment of A Year of Techniques focusses on the favourite skill of 1980s jumper fans: Intarsia. Bristol Ivy’s Brambling Shawl sets out to separate intarsia’s reputation away from images of a grinning Giles Brandreth in a striking and bold colourblock design. Knit in […]

New Pattern: Emberwarm Shawl

New Pattern: Emberwarm Shawl

I am excited to announce the release of my new shawl pattern: Emberwarm. This smart and stylish shawl is so named for the resemblance of warm embers in a fire grate, and the feeling of cosy warmth that both will give. The shawl is knit […]

FO: A New Shawl Off The Needles

FO: A New Shawl Off The Needles

I finished my most recent shawl over a week ago and spent last weekend tiptoeing my way around the large foam interlocking play mats that serve as a handy blocking surface for the beautification of lace.

It had been my full intention to release a brand new pattern today with a mini-fanfare, but with the aim of providing the most comprehensive instructions I can I am nose-deep in illustrator charts and blocking guide diagrams. Of all the feedback that I have found most useful from recent pattern releases were the amount of customers that said they found the blocking guide and diagrams included with the Mrs Tumnus Shawl to be indispensable in achieving a perfect end product.

My newest pattern will also be a curved shawl, but with a shallower crescent shape to sit slightly wider over the shoulders but also with a shallow enough neck edge and wide enough curve to be worn as a scarf.
New shawl pattern teaser picture from Eskimimi MakesThis picture is only a mere teaser for now as I shall save the rest for the pattern release, but it will be released in the coming days, perfect for anyone looking for something special to knit with a favourite 100g skein of fingering weight yarn.