Tag: lace

Knowing When To Unravel

Knowing When To Unravel

When July worked her way around I was waiting, needles poised, to cast on the latest project from A Year Of Techniques. I’d brought Talmadge to a sprint finish (though to this date it is still awaiting a pair of buttons) and was ready for […]

A Knitting Sprint Finish: Crossing The Line With The Talmadge Cloche

A Knitting Sprint Finish: Crossing The Line With The Talmadge Cloche

Another project from A Year Of Techniques has freed itself from its needle-y bonds and plopped itself down into a bubbly bath. A relaxing end to an emotional knit that, at one point, I did not think would ever get finished. I am relieved to […]

Hats In June: Hot Weather Knitting Woes

Hats In June: Hot Weather Knitting Woes

My knitting motivation has been a bit thin on the ground these past two weeks. Some warmer-than-usual June weather in the UK turned my greenhouse of a living room into a suburban sauna and brought my hat progress to a crashing halt. Though Talmadge is a light, lace hat designed for summer use, the thought of wearing or indeed knitting a hat on days when I would have considered shaving all of my hair off to get a few Celsius relief just seemed unbearable.

Though I have the vast majority of the main body of the hat knit it is the fast-approaching brim that is providing a bit of resistance to me picking up the needles of an evening still. If you were to ask me what my least favourite stitch of all time might be, I would always answer moss stitch (or seed stitch, for those who sympathise transatlantically). I have never really enjoyed the rhythm of 1×1 rib or its shifty cousin Moss, but though I can appreciate springy Rib’s qualities and aesthetic, Moss stitch just does nothing for me on either score. So, to try and crack on with finishing this hat and to avoid leaving it languishing I think I’ll swap it out for a mistake rib of some form (perhaps a garter rib variation) to keep the full width of the brim and keep the curl at bay.

Whether I finish this hat before the July 6th release of the next instalment of A Year Of Techniques will depend on a number of factors, chief of which remains the weather. Wish for me a few overcast days and no dropped stitches and I may have a completed cloche for you in a week…

Knitting Talmadge: Does My Head Look Big In This?

Knitting Talmadge: Does My Head Look Big In This?

June’s pattern knitalong for A Year Of Techniques is Romi Hill’s Talmadge Cloche, which introduces the element of knitted on edgings as this month’s technique. A knitted on edging is a fantastic way of providing a decorative and/or functional edging to a piece of knitting […]

Lace Pattern Preferences Survey Results

Lace Pattern Preferences Survey Results

Thank you to everybody who took part in the survey to help determine the format of future Eskimimi Makes patterns to best suit knitters’ preferences. My own preference for lace knitting is to knit from charts as I find them easier to manage and keep […]