Tag: Eskimimi Knits

Days Off To Knit, Shop And Archive

Days Off To Knit, Shop And Archive

My fiancé and I have treated ourselves to a few days off work to just enjoy doing a few of the things that we love. As I write this Russell is sitting by my feet playing Arkham City on the XBox whilst I sort through […]

Revisited Knits

Revisited Knits

I only have one pair of mittens, so they get almost constant use during the autumn and winter and are invaluable when the big freeze has settled in as it has now in the UK. I designed and knit these Flutter Butterfly Mittens in August […]

The Old And The New

The Old And The New

I have re-started the task of trying to rescue some of my old content. It’s a slow process, and I am not sure how much remains in web archives, but my old blog, Eskimimi Knits, was a refuge for me, and the words and joy I took in having a little place in the world, online, to share the things that made me happy, meant a great deal.

My blog is now purely for celebration, but I’d love to have kept all of my old content, and the loss of my blog certainly was a particularly sad thing for me, especially as I had comments from friends, some now sadly no longer alive, that gave me such joy and comfort on many of the posts on there. Though I cannot move the comments across (due to them only being archived on Wayback Machine rather than in a database), I can at least copy the posts that were captures, and paste them one by one back into the new blog.

Though it will take quite some time, it is something I’d like to pursue. My only nervousness is that I do not want to annoy any readers with this ‘old’ content. Though I think there is value in the old posts and I am enjoying reading them again myself, I can’t just assume that everyone will feel the same. One thing that I am uncertain about is whether they appear on RSS feed readers and blog aggregators. Both the services Mr Awesome and I use seem to be ignoring thee old posts as I upload them, so they are not showing in our timelines, but I am not sure if all services work the same way.

My intention was just to upload a few every now and again, but I was wondering if it would be better if I just saved then all as drafts and published them in one big block, if it did turn out that they were appearing on people’s feed readers and people didn’t want to read them?

Any thoughts on this from the folks that do stop by and read this blog would be greatly appreciated.

Fork Pom Poms – How To Make A Pom Pom Using A Fork

Fork Pom Poms – How To Make A Pom Pom Using A Fork

I believe the best way of making small pompoms is using a fork. There are many ways of making nice, full and round looking pompoms (pompons, pom-poms or pom-pons as they are variously written) but the quickest and most wonderful way I know of creating […]

Photography Tutorial/FAQ Part II

Photography Tutorial/FAQ Part II

Part One of this tutorial explained how I set up my space ready for taking my photographs, so now I am going to move on to how I set up my camera and actually take my photographs. This post will deal mostly with camera settings, […]

Short rows for the sock enthusiast (Part Two)

Short rows for the sock enthusiast (Part Two)

Short rows for socks, part 2: How (View Part One here)

This second part of the exploration into short rows and their usefulness in socks concentrates on the how part of the short row mystery. Specifically, though, it is a look at how I make my short row heels and toes. My method is not in any way the definitive method – there are many ways of knitting short rows, and this just happens to be my personal favourite for both looks and ease of knitting.

Wherever you are starting your heel or toe, whether beginning toe-up with a provisional cast on, knitting the toe last, knitting the heel in-line or as an afterthought, you will be knitting over exactly half of your total leg circumference stitches. Instances of how to set up placement of your heel or toe are given in part one of this look at short rows for socks. So, for a 48 (52, 56, 60, 64, 68, 72) stitch sock, start with 24 (26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36) stitches on a single DPN/circular and knit back and forth. All stitches should be slipped purl-wise.

Row 1 (RS): Knit until last stitch, bring yarn forward between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn back to rear of work, slip stitch back to left needle.  There is now a ‘wrap’ around the base of the last stitch. Turn work.
Row 2 (WS): Purl until last stitch, take yarn backwards between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn to front of work, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Row 3: Knit until one stitch before nearest ‘wrapped’ stitch. Bring yarn forward between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn back to rear of work, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Row 4: Purl until one stitch before nearest ‘wrapped’ stitch, take yarn backwards between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn to front of work, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Repeat these last two rows until you have 10 (10, 12, 12, 12, 14, 14) unwrapped stitches in the centre of your short row sections.  You’re not finished yet, but at this half way point, take a little while to get to know your wraps.
Recognise your wraps:
Knitting short rows is made much easier if you can recognise your wraps.  Here, changing yarn colour has helped highlight the ‘collar’ of yarn sitting around the base of the stitch it is wrapping.  The stitches to the left of this newly wrapped stitch are also wrapped, but in the red yarn and so are less obvious at first glance.
The next part of knitting your short row heel/toe involves re-knitting over your wrapped stitches, picking up the wraps as you go, and working one further row each time.
Row 1: Knit to the first wrapped stitch (1).  Slip that stitch to the right needle (2). Using the tip of the left needle, pick up the wrap (3).  Place the slipped stitch back onto the left needle, alongside the wrap. Knit the stitch and its wrap together, through the back loop (4). Bring yarn forward between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn back to rear of work, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Row 2: Purl to the first wrapped stitch, slip that stitch to the right needle, using the tip of the left needle, pick up the wrap.  Place the slipped stitch back onto the left needle, alongside the wrap. Purl the stitch and its wrap together. Take yarn backwards between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn to front of work, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Row 3: Knit to the first wrapped stitch, which now has two wraps.  Slip that stitch to the right needle, using the tip of the left needle, pick up both wraps .  Place the slipped stitch back onto the left needle, alongside the wraps. Knit the stitch and its wraps together, through the back loop. Bring yarn forward between needles, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn back to rear of work, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Row 4: Purl to the first wrapped stitch, which now has two wraps.  Slip that stitch to the right needle, using the tip of the left needle, pick up both wraps .  Place the slipped stitch back onto the left needle, alongside the wraps. Purl the stitch and its wraps together. Bring yarn backwards between needles to rear of work, slip last stitch to right needle, bring yarn forward between needles, slip stitch back to left needle. Turn work.
Repeat rows 3 and 4 until all wraps have been knitted together with their stitches.

You are now ready to either undo your provisional cast on for your toe-up sock and surge ahead with your knitting, carry on with your sock if you are making an in-line heel or kitchener your stitches with their waiting partners to complete your sock for an afterthought heel or top-down sock. Short rows are simple, really.